Thursday, 1 December 2016

Ironjaws Megaboss part 7

Once I’d finished his black armour the main part of the Megaboss was looking more complete. There are quite a few details to attend to but the outstanding major elements are the axe and the dracoth skull on his shoulder.


I decided to turn my attention to the skull. As the single most striking element of the mini, it’s the thing that first drew my attention to it. And, as much as I’ve enjoyed painting the armour, the skull has always looked like it was going to be the fun part of the job!

I haven’t been disappointed. Painting the skull was a thoroughly enjoyable experience and I’m very pleased with the result. A major part of the painting process went into resolving the textures. I wanted the skull to have a slightly rough, gnarly looking texture. In addition to the bone texture, I wanted to add chips and scratches. A lot of fun was had resolving these textures and figuring out the balance between then.






My colour palette for the skull is one I often use for bone.

Base colour:

Games Workshop - Rakarth Flesh

Shade:

The Army Painter Quickshade - Strong Tone & Soft Tone
Games Workshop – Rhinox Hide

Mid-tones:

The Army Painter Quickshade - Soft Tone

Highlights:

Games Workshop - Rakarth Flesh
Scalecolour Fantasy & Games – Purity White

The shading is built up with a series of glazes using the The Army Painter Quickshades. Rhinox Hide adds a bit more depth and opacity to the colour of the horns. This combination gives me a good range of yellow/brown and red/brown shades to play with.

I built the highlights on top of the mid-tones by gradually adding white to the Rakarth Flesh. The final highlights are pure white. Once the highlights were dry, I glazed a little dilute soft tone quickshade here and there to soften the effect and tie everything together.

Friday, 18 November 2016

Ironjaws Megaboss part 6

The Boss is back and this time I’m not stopping until he’s finished!


Despite putting my Megaboss on the backburner several times, I love painting this mini! One reason for this is I’ve been able to take my NMM technique in a new direction by combining it with texture techniques. The work has sometimes been quite challenging, but it’s also made for some rewarding painting sessions.

I decided to paint the armour on the shoulders and arms as blackened metal. This wasn’t in my initial plan but I feel the addition of black provided a necessary contrast to the other colours, and it makes the overall colour palette feel more complete.

As I said while painting the Farseer, black is a colour I’ve not used for many years. The practise I gained on the Farseer has paid off and I was able to approach the blackened armour with considerably more confidence than I would otherwise have done!

The key colour is - no prizes for guessing - Vallejo Dark Sea Blue. It’s mixed 50/50 with black for the base colour and then with white for the mid-tones and highlights. Once the rust effects were painted on, I repeatedly glazed over the entire area with highly diluted Dark Sea Blue. When I’d built up a pleasing depth of colour, I picked out a few extreme highlights with white. The Dark Sea Blue ties it all together and gives some subtle depth of colour to the blackened areas.

Before & after glazing with Dark Sea Blue.




Friday, 11 November 2016

Eldar Farseer - chosing a colour palette

As usual I worked out my ideas for a colour palette before I began painting but once I'd started I allowed my plans to evolve as the work progressed.


It took me quite some time to make my initial choices for an overall colour scheme for my Farseer. I considered a lot of options but in the end I decided to paint the majority of the costume in dark tones with a contrasting light outer robe. The colour palette features black, blue, red, purple, gold and light grey. This gave me some bold colours and strong contrasts, both light/dark and warm/cool, to experiment with. In addition both black and white are colours I tend to avoid using so, by choosing to work with them, I’d set myself a little challenge.


I used black as an overall base colour for the scheme. Although I first learnt to paint minis with a black base colour, it’s been many years since I’ve worked in this way. I used a mix of GW Abadon Black, for good coverage, and Scalecolour Flat Black, for a matt finish.

The first part of the mini I painted was the inside of the robe and straightaway I found myself struggling! The black base colour really threw me as my colours behaved very differently from what I'd become used to. Colour is relative and colours that would have been vibrant on a light base looked chalky and washed out on a dark base. After this initial set back, I gradually built up a more pleasing intensity in my colours by layering them. In addition I would have had an easier time blending my colours into a black base if, rather than using a pure black, I had mixed a little of my colour into the black base.

For the black areas of the Farseer’s costume I used Dark Sea Blue in my mix. This gave a subtle blue/green tone to my blacks and tied it in with the cool elements of my colour palette. Black can be highlighted with a straightforward grey tone, but the addition of a little colour adds a lot of interest to what could otherwise be a rather flat and boring colour.


The use of black in my palette helped me to create a darker and moodier feel, more so than I would normally achieve. This is exactly what I wanted as I think it suits the nature of an Eldar Farseer. However the palette needed some contrast and the Eldar are not all about darkness!

My initial intention had been to use white for the outer robe but I quickly rejected this as the scheme developed. White would have been too strong a contrast for the overall feel I wanted. I chose instead to use a light grey, which felt right both in terms of contrast and as a colour choice for the sometimes ambiguous Eldar.

The obvious colour choice seemed to me to be a cool grey but I decided to experiment. One of the basic rules of colour I was taught at college was ‘never mix warm and cool grey in a design’. For years I never questioned this until I was required to create a design in an Art Deco style. After some research and experimentation I discovered that the best colour scheme for the job used both warm and cool grey. Under the right circumstances warm and cool greys can be used together to great effect.


I decided to attempt a warm/cool grey contrast on the outer robe. To do this I used warm greys in the shadows and cool greys in the mid tones and highlights. It took a lot of going back and forth between the tones to get the balance right but I’m delighted with the result!


The colour contrast needed to be kept fairly subtle to work but it adds a lot of interest to the otherwise plain outer robe. I’ve also incorporated a subtle stippled texture to contrast with the smooth armour. In addition by using Games Workshop paints on the outer robe and Scale colour on everything else, there is a pleasing contrast between the matt finish of the inner robes and the soft sheen on the grey outer robe.

Monday, 7 November 2016

Golden Demon: Enemies of the Imperium

Yesterday felt rather special and it caught me by surprise! I was hoping like mad to get a trophy for my Farseer and was delighted that it won Gold. But when I saw who the other Gold winners were, and what they had won with, I tucked my statuette under my arm so I would have both hands free to applaud the latest Slayer Sword Winner.

I honestly didn’t expect to hear my own name at that point and it still hasn’t quite sunk in!



It makes me think back to my 21 yr old self, entering the first Golden Demon in 1987 with no idea of the journey he was about to go on. I’m extremely proud of the swords and trophies I’ve won but way above and beyond that I feel grateful for all the friendships and experiences I’ve had as a result of my miniature painting hobby!

Please forgive the cloying sentiment but I’m a bit tired and very over excited. Normal service will be resumed shortly.

Friday, 4 November 2016

Eldar Farseer


The Farseer is finished and in the end I had plenty of time to get everything done in time for Saturday’s competition. I’ve really enjoyed being able to turn this project around in just a few weeks and it served the purpose of getting me into a steady routine very nicely.

It’s also given me the chance to try a few things I’ve been meaning to have a go at for quite some time. Aside from the use of black in my palette I’ve tried object source lighting for the first time.

The base is inspired by something that Roman Lappat did over on Massive Voodo. As soon as I saw what Roman did I wanted to try it myself and this project felt like the perfect opportunity!